Dismantled 1964 Aston Martin DB5 sold at auction for £417,000

Posted on November 2, 2022Comments Off on Dismantled 1964 Aston Martin DB5 sold at auction for £417,000

Classic cars are worth big money, but when the most collectible are offered to the highest bidder they’re usually complete.

Not this one. It’s a 1964 Aston Martin DB5 – a car synonymous with the James Bond movie franchise. 

This is highly-revered example of the British classic is one of just 679 UK-spec saloon models produced and has been subject to an ‘exhaustive’ restoration that began more than half a decade ago, hence why it’s in bits.

It went to the virtual block in an online auction last week with an estimated value of around £300,000. However, a bidding war between collectors in the final hours of the sale saw it go for a whopping £416,900. As life-size Lego sets go, this is one of the most expensive ever.

Bond car in bits sells for £417,000: Collectors from three different countries went into a bidding war over this dismantled 1964 Aston Martin DB5, pushing its price up by £100,000 in the final two hours of the online auction

Bond car in bits sells for £417,000: Collectors from three different countries went into a bidding war over this dismantled 1964 Aston Martin DB5, pushing its price up by £100,000 in the final two hours of the online auction

The Aston was sold by Collecting Cars – an online-only auction platform that specialises in high-value, rare and hugely sought-after motors.

It auction site told This is Money that a scramble in the final moments of the auction saw its price rise by £100,000 in the final two hours as bidders from three different countries fought over the dismantled machine.

Some 75 bids were placed in total, the sale report confirms. 

The online auction house said it could not reveal the identity of the winning bidder, but assured us that it will be ‘staying in the UK’ to be completed to a ‘very high standard’.

This sixties sports car was set to send collectors into a frenzy, being one of the few remaining ‘home market’ right hand drive models available.

The car left the Newport Pagnell factory on 3 July 1964 finished in Black Pearl paintwork with a White Gold leather interior trim. 

It was fitted with the iconic chrome wire wheels, an oil cooler and electric windows, as well as a few optional extras, including Selectaride adjustable shock absorbers, triple carburettors, and Dunlop RS5 tyres.

The seven-day online auction for the dismantled 1964 Aston Martin DB5 started last week and ended on Tuesday evening

The seven-day online auction for the dismantled 1964 Aston Martin DB5 started last week and ended on Tuesday evening

Sold as seen! The bodywork is stripped right back and even laser scanned and inspected for any imperfections before the new owner chooses which paint colour to spray it

Sold as seen! The bodywork is stripped right back and even laser scanned and inspected for any imperfections before the new owner chooses which paint colour to spray it

The car left the Newport Pagnell factory on 3 July 1964 and was finished in Black Pearl paintwork. Fully rebuilt, it should look something like this 1964 saloon model sold by Hexagon Classics in 2017 - though this one is finished in Goodwood Green

A similar-age Aston Martin DB5 saloon sold by a classic car specialist five years ago

The car left the Newport Pagnell factory on 3 July 1964 and was finished in Black Pearl paintwork. Fully rebuilt, it should look something like this 1964 saloon model sold by Hexagon Classics in 2017 – though this one is finished in Goodwood Green

The DB5 was originally sold by London motor dealer, Brooklands of Bond Street, with the first owner – Mr Robert Symonds of Wembley – registering the Aston in his name on 1 January 1965 with the number plate ‘GYV 453C’.

Just a few years later, the car was exported to the US, where it has spent the vast majority of its six-decade life.

During that period it was resprayed Caribbean Pearl blue and the interior retrimmed with red leather – though Collecting Cars says there is little documentation covering the car’s stay in America.

The car has been totally gutted and painstakingly restored so that it can be returned to the road in stunning condition

The car has been totally gutted and painstakingly restored so that it can be returned to the road in stunning condition

The DB5 was originally sold by London motor dealer, Brooklands of Bond Street, with the first owner registering it on 1 January 1965 with the number plate 'GYV 453C'

The DB5 was originally sold by London motor dealer, Brooklands of Bond Street, with the first owner registering it on 1 January 1965 with the number plate ‘GYV 453C’

Just a few years later, the car was exported to the US, where it has spent the vast majority of its six decade-long life. It was repainted blue at the time, which can still be seen on the fuel cap on the C-pillar here

Just a few years later, the car was exported to the US, where it has spent the vast majority of its six decade-long life. It was repainted blue at the time, which can still be seen on the fuel cap on the C-pillar here

Only in the last decade was it discovered in San Diego, California, before the vendor brought it back to the UK in 2016 and officially re-registered it for the UK roads and began the process of dismantling it to recondition every last part of the car.

This includes a replacement engine – a straight-six block found in the DB4 Vantage. This has been rebuilt to an upgraded 4.2-litre specification, and which is accompanied by triple SU carburettors and a five-speed manual gearbox for improved performance and reliability.

Collecting Cars says the DB5 saloon has been completely stripped back to its lightweight steel tube structure, then scanned and inspected for any imperfections. 

Only in the last decade was it discovered in San Diego, California, before the vendor brought it back to the UK in 2016 and officially re-registered it for the UK roads and began the process of dismantling it to recondition every last part of the car

Only in the last decade was it discovered in San Diego, California, before the vendor brought it back to the UK in 2016 and officially re-registered it for the UK roads and began the process of dismantling it to recondition every last part of the car

It comes with a replacement engine, which is a straight-six block found in the DB4 Vantage. This has been rebuilt to an upgraded 4.2-litre specification and offers improved performance and reliability

It comes with a replacement engine, which is a straight-six block found in the DB4 Vantage. This has been rebuilt to an upgraded 4.2-litre specification and offers improved performance and reliability

Every component is present, correct and mostly in near-glimmering condition, as can be seen in these images of each major part grouped in the vendor's storage facility next to the bare-metal body, while smaller items are kept in comprehensively categorised boxes in the background

Every component is present, correct and mostly in near-glimmering condition, as can be seen in these images of each major part grouped in the vendor’s storage facility next to the bare-metal body, while smaller items are kept in comprehensively categorised boxes in the background

‘The frame was subsequently re-wrapped, the nose and steel components of the bodywork replaced, and with the frame and the floor powder-coated,’ a spokesperson for the company explained to us ahead of the auction going live just over a week ago.

‘New body panels have been hand-crafted by original factory team members, to carry as much authenticity through the restoration as possible, also ensuring the correct shape and fit.’

The body is not yet painted and the seats and other interior panels remain untouched after being removed from the cabin.

Mechanically, various elements of the suspension and steering have also been restored or renewed, too

Mechanically, various elements of the suspension and steering have also been restored or renewed, too

The body is not yet painted and the seats and other interior panels remain untouched after being removed from the cabin

The body is not yet painted and the seats and other interior panels remain untouched after being removed from the cabin

Collecting Cars says the lot represented a 'compelling opportunity' for a collector because they can choose to either return the DB5 to its original specification or pick a unique colour combination when respraying and reupholstering

Collecting Cars says the lot represented a ‘compelling opportunity’ for a collector because they can choose to either return the DB5 to its original specification or pick a unique colour combination when respraying and reupholstering

The auction house said the car represented a ‘compelling opportunity’ for a collector to either return the DB5 to its original specification or to choose their own colour combination when resprayed and reupholstered, Collecting Cars says.

Mechanically, various elements of the suspension and steering have also been restored or renewed, too.

Every component is present, correct and mostly in near-glimmering condition, as can be seen in these images of each major part grouped in the vendor’s storage facility next to the bare-metal body, while smaller items are kept in comprehensively categorised boxes in the background.

All that’s left is for a new owner to put it all back together.

This British Motor Industry Heritage Trust factory record certificate accompanied the sale of the DB5, confirming the Aston Martin's original 'home market' right-hand-drive specification

This British Motor Industry Heritage Trust factory record certificate accompanied the sale of the DB5, confirming the Aston Martin’s original ‘home market’ right-hand-drive specification

Collecting Cars sold a similar DB5 in sublime 'concours' condition last year for a winning bid of £633,500. This dismantled example, bought for £416,900, could return a profit once pieced back together

Collecting Cars sold a similar DB5 in sublime ‘concours’ condition last year for a winning bid of £633,500. This dismantled example, bought for £416,900, could return a profit once pieced back together

If restored to pristine, museum-ready condition, the predicted value of this British motoring icon could be as high as £700k, according to classic car valuation experts

If restored to pristine, museum-ready condition, the predicted value of this British motoring icon could be as high as £700k, according to classic car valuation experts

‘It represents a very rare opportunity to acquire a project where the paintwork and interior finishes can be completely tailored to the next owner’s wishes; whether you wish to ‘build your own Bond car’, return the car to its exact factory specification, or to conclude the restoration in a unique colour scheme,’ the spokesperson explained before bidding began.

Collecting Cars sold a similar DB5 in sublime ‘concours’ condition last year for a winning bid of £633,500. Selling at £416,900 this week, this example shows the fortune enthusiasts are willing to spend on a desirable model, even when it’s delivered in individual pieces.

Classic car insurance and valuations specialists, Hagerty UK, says that once fully restored and in ‘excellent’ order, a 1964 Aston Martin DB5 saloon is worth over half a million pounds (£534,000). 

However, if restored to pristine, museum-ready condition, the predicted value of this British motoring icon rises to just over £700,000.

Given that the winning bidder will not have to fork out on finding replacement parts and having them rebuilt, this dismantled Aston could represent a sound investment for a collector with plenty of time – and storage space – to hand.

CARS & MOTORING: ON TEST

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